Tag Archives: subfloor

Advanced House Framing – The Pros and Cons

photo 1

What is Advanced House Framing, or what some term it: Optimum Value Engineering (OVE)?  OVE is a method of framing in order to reduce the amount of waste during residential home framing.  Structural values are not affected with the use of less lumber, while energy efficiency is boosted by the use of insulation, resulting in a higher R-Value overall.

Techniques of Advanced House Framing include:

  • Design floor and wall framing at 24” on center, rather than the standard 16” on center
  • In lieu of using studs for backing, install two-stud corner framing with drywall clips or scrap lumber (another example of eliminating waste)
  • Eliminate headers in non-load bearing walls
  • Utilize in-line framing in floor, wall and roofing areas (vertical to each other) to transfer the load downward

Cost savings in material and labor can be achieved by using this technique however, structural engineering must be utilized to ensure the installation will meet local and international residential and building codes.

The good, the bad, and the ugly…

Some advantages to OVE:

  • Lower material and labor costs (framing material)
  • Less environmental impact due to reduction of waste, and less disposal costs
  • Lower energy costs thanks to thermal bridging (additional insulation allows for fewer studs and rafters with increased R-value)
  • Less incidence of drywall issues, such as nail pops and cracking

The disadvantages of OVE:

  • Expect higher design and engineering costs
  • Expect potential issues with local building officials and inspectors due to the unorthodox design
  • If you hire a framer without experience in OVE, there is a potential for higher labor costs due to a learning curve
  • Although there are framing material savings, other material costs can increase including but not limited to: steel plates, drywall clips and subflooring
  • Some siding specifies nailers at 16” on center, making them incompatible with the 24” on center OVE framing
  • Energy savings are not significantly substantial, in some cases only resulting in an additional R-value of 1

When you are ready to start a new home build, or a remodel of your existing home, please take these tips and suggestions into consideration with your architect, engineer, building officials, and especially yourself.  An insignificant amount of lumber savings may result in higher costs in the long run, however it is up to your discretion whether the lessened environmental impact, a slightly more insulated house, and a home that is just as structurally sound as a standard framed home is more important to you, and worth the value.

References:

Musings of an Energy Nerd (2010).  www.greenbuildingadvisor.com/blogs/dept/musings/pros-and-cons-advanced-framing

Advanced House Framing (2012).  www.energy.gov.energysaver/articles/advanced-house-framing

Amanda Regelin, Sr. Project Manager (Residential and Commercial Divisions)

Please feel free to contact us at info@crownbuilds.com or 219-488-2400 for more useful tips, and don’t forget to view our latest projects at http://crownconstructionin.houzz.com/ and

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Crown-Construction-Contracting/1420513534844348

www.crownbuilds.com